Videos

Study: The Most Anti-cancer Veggie + How to Eat More of it | Highest Sulforaphane Cruciferous Vegetables

You probably already know that cruciferous veggies like broccoli, kale, and cabbage are especially healthy, but did you know that not all crucifers are created equal? Some of them are better at fighting cancer (and have more antioxidants) than others!

In today’s video I go over a study comparing the cytotoxic (aka, cancer fighting) activity, sulforaphane levels (aka, a super cancer-fighting compound), and antioxidant levels between different types of cruciferous vegetables.

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Links mentioned in the video:

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Intuitive Eating, Videos, Weight loss advice

Video: How to deal with cravings when trying to lose weight (or eat healthier)

Are your cravings getting in the way of you losing weight (or eating healthier) while eating intuitively? In my latest video I’m giving you 6 pieces of advice for how to figure out when to give into your cravings, and when to go for the healthier option instead.

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Study links & links mentioned in the video:

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Videos, Weight loss advice

Studies: Does Exercise Make you Overeat?

I often hear people say that exercising (especially cardio) is no better for weight loss than just cutting the equivalent number of calories from your diet. In fact, I’ve even had people tell me that cardio is a waste of time because they just eat all the calories back anyway.

There are a lot of reasons that’s wrong, but today I’m focusing on one: how exercise influences your appetite. Plus, how it influences your hormones, and how much you actually end up eating in the long term.

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Study links & links mentioned in the video:

Intuitive Eating, Videos

Video: How to maintain a lower weight with intuitive eating (and lose more weight) | 5 tips

A lot of intuitive eating bloggers, coaches, etc. believe we can’t do anything to influence our “natural weight” that we’ll maintain at with intuitive eating. They tell people who are overweight that they should just accept that that’s their natural weight and not even try to aim for a healthy weight. But based on the research, I disagree.

(I do, however, 100% agree with self-acceptance and self-love at every weight, and that you shouldn’t have to aim for a healthy weight if you don’t want to.)

See my how-to guide for what intuitive eating is & how to start doing it!

In today’s video, I’m sharing 5 factors that will determine what weight you’ll maintain at (and how much you can lose) with intuitive eating, 4 of which are within your control.

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Intuitive Eating Scale mentioned in the video:

One side version of IE scale

Study links & links mentioned in the video:

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Nutrition, Videos

Studies: Foods that improve your mood (+ depression and anxiety symptoms)

Today I’m sharing something a little closer to my personal research interests (given that I’m getting my PhD in psychology/neuroscience): how your diet can affect your mood! In the video I quickly cover tryptophan, the amino acid that has antidepressant-like effects, and go over a study directly looking at how people’s symptoms of depression, anxiety, and overall mood are affected by being put on a high vs low tryptophan diet.Β 

And the list of high-tryptophan foods from the study is below!

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it here:

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High-tryptophan foods:

  • Nuts like cashews, walnuts, and almonds
  • Legumes like soybeans, peanuts, and chickpeas
  • Seeds like sesame, pumpkin, and sunflower
  • Grains like oats, wheat, rice, and corn

Links mentioned in the video:

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Videos, Weight loss advice

Study: Weight Loss on Vegan versus Mediterranean Diets

The media LOVES to talk about how great the Mediterranean diet is for health, weight loss, etc. compared to the standard American diet.

But honestly, pretty much anything is better than the standard American diet (aka the Western diet).

Very few studies have looked at the Mediterranean diet compared to other non-Western diets, but a new study came out recently comparing the Mediterranean diet to a low-ish fat vegan diet for health and weight loss. In this video, I go over the weight loss aspects; specifically, how much people lost in 16 weeks on each diet, without eating less or exercising more. 

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Links mentioned in the video:

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Recipes

Easy Creamy Tofu and Pea Curry (aka Matar Paneer) – Vegan, WFPB

Β 

As life gets busier (between quarantine ending and closing on a house), my BIGGEST cooking goal these days is to come up with super simple recipes that are both healthy and easy to make in bulk. And my latest favorite creation that fits the bill is this super simple tofu & pea curry!

It has all the creamy, comforting goodness of the authentic Indian version (called Matar or Mutter Paneer), but without any of the cheese, cream or oil. The only source of fat in this recipe, in fact, are cashews! (And if you want to get fat free with it, you could omit the cashew cream. But then… it wouldn’t be creamy anymore. πŸ˜‰ )

And bonus, this version is high in protein!

This recipe is super simple, because the ONLY chopping required is cubing the tofu–everything else is just chucked into the blender.

I also cook this in bulk by doubling the recipe below (cooking times are the same)–it takes me about 30 mins of prep time for 8 meals’ worth of food!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 – 16oz block super firm tofu, cubed
  • 1.5 cups frozen peas
  • 1 white or yellow onion
  • 1″ ginger
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 1 green chili pepper (can also use ~1 tbsp canned)
  • 3/8 cup water
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds (or sub powder)
  • Half a 15oz can tomato sauce (or pureed fresh tomato)
  • 1 + 1/4 tsp coriander
  • Heaping 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt, more to taste
  • 1 tsp cayenne powder, or to taste*

Cashew cream:

  • 2/3 cup raw cashews, soaked
  • 1/2 cup water

*This will depend on the chili you use. When I use my spicier homegrown chilis, I omit the cayenne. If you use canned mild chilis, you’ll probably want to keep the cayenne in.

Directions:

  1. Add the onion, ginger, garlic, chili pepper, and 3/8c water to your blender, and blend until smooth. Let sit for a minute or two before opening it, as the chili will be airborne for a moment!
  2. Meanwhile, saute the cumin seeds with a splash of water until they start to turn brown, 1-2 minutes. Add the pureed onion mixture, and boil for 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the tomato sauce, coriander, turmeric, and salt, and boil for another ~5 minutes.
  4. Add the cubed tofu and peas and stir them in gently, just as much as needed to combine everything, so as not to break the tofu.
  5. Set the Instant Pot to cook on high pressure for 2 mins, and let it release naturally for 10-15 minutes. (For stovetop version: simmer, covered, for 15 minutes, or until the peas are tender but not mushy. Stir it occasionally.)
  6. While the curry is cooking, blend the cashew cream ingredients, and set aside. Once the curry is done cooking, gently stir in the cashew cream.
  7. Serve with rice, paratha, or naan, and enjoy!

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Intuitive Eating, Videos

Video: How is Intuitive Eating Different from Overeating?

I got a good question on a recent video, asking where the line is between intuitive eating and overeating. Given that intuitive eating involves eating whatever you want, whenever you want, as much as you want, I can see how from the outside, it would just seem like constant overeating!

But in fact, intuitive eating is one of the BEST ways to prevent overeating, and there’s a lot of great research backing it up. (See my how-to guide for more details, and to start eating intuitively)

In today’s video, I go over why overeating and intuitive eating are completely different.

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Study links & links mentioned in the video:

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Videos, Weight loss advice

Video: How to Use Water to Lose Weight (Scientific Studies)

The diet industry tries its best to convince you that you need them, but weight loss can be as easy as making small lifestyle changes… and unlike diets, lifestyle tweaks actually lead to sustainable weight loss and maintenance.

And bonus, these kinds of lifestyle changes also make you healthier & feel better.

A powerful example of this that I’ve found in studies is that just drinking more water can lead to a LOT of weight loss! So in today’s video, I go over studies on how you can use water to lose weight, with details on what’s optimal in terms of timing and quantity.

Here’s a link to the video page, or you can watch it below:

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Study links from the video:

  • Study links: Water before meals 1 2 (There are 2+ more showing the same thing too)
  • Study links: Water during diet 1
  • Study links: Water thermogenesis 1 2
  • Patreon

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Recipes

4 Ingredient Iron-boosting Bars (Vegan)

Did you know that about 20% of women in the US are iron deficient? (Thanks largely to Aunt Flo)

I know I’ve been slacking on making sure I’m getting enough, so I’ve been researching the iron content of a ton of different ingredients, and coming up with recipes that are super high in iron.

I figured my high-iron recipes wouldn’t necessarily be the next great taste sensation given my main focus is on their nutrient content, but on day 2 of my new iron-finding kick, these bars proved me oh so wrong. They are incredibly delicious–for breakfast, snacks, or even dessert.

Just 100 calories of them provides 13% of your recommended daily intake of iron, and a breakfast-sized amount (let’s say 500 calories), satisfies a whopping 65% of your daily iron needs. (See below for more nutrition notes)

To put it in more exciting terms… calorie for calorie, these bars have 4x as much iron as chicken, and twice as much iron as STEAK!

In good news, my husband tried them and loves them so much that he keeps asking for them, and has even dubbed them “the perfect breakfast.” In bad news, a batch doesn’t last me nearly as long as I thought it would, because I had originally expected to be the only one eating them… πŸ˜›

Makes 16 bars; each 100-calorie bar has 13% of the female RDA for iron (26% of the male RDA).

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups puffed amaranth (requires about 2/3-1 cup dry amaranth)
  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tbsp molasses
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup*
  • 1/8 tsp salt (optional)
*You can sub out the maple syrup for agave, or more molasses

Directions:

  1. Preheat a pot over medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Make sure the bottom of the pot is the same size or smaller than your burner.
  2. Pop the amaranth: add one tablespoon of dry amaranth to the pot; it should start popping almost immediately (it looks like mini popcorn). Shake or stir the pot consistently while the amaranth pops. Once most of the grains have popped, or once the remaining unpopped ones starts to get a darker brown, pour out the amaranth into a separate bowl. Then repeat the process with the rest of the dried amaranth until you have 1 cup. It sounds difficult, but once you get the hang of it, it’s easy and honestly pretty fun. I found this video to be useful! (but no need to sieve it)
  3. Once cooled, add the popped amaranth to a 9″ square (or round) pan, and add all the other ingredients. Stir until well combined. (If it seems dry/crumbly, add more molasses–the consistency will depend on what % of your amaranth ended up being puffed.)
  4. Press mixture into pan, refrigerate, cut into bars, and enjoy!

Extra nutrition notes:

  • With the ingredients I use, the entire recipe contains 36mg of iron; a premenopausal woman’s daily RDA of iron is 18mg! For men and postmenopausal women, the RDA is 8mg.
  • For my tahini, I use Artisana Tahini. I’ve noticed that the iron content of tahini can vary somewhat, and Artisana is one of the highest iron contents I’ve found.
  • For amaranth, I use Bob’s Red Mill from Amazon.
  • For molasses, I use Grandma’s.

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